April 2021

The Ultimate Packing List for Female Travelers

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backpacker in front of an incredible lake view
Last Updated: 4/27/21 | April 27th, 2021

I know that it can be daunting trying to figure out what to pack for a week, a month, or a year abroad without much — or any — prior experience in the place you aim to visit. I found myself in the same situation eight years ago, but with the benefit of hindsight and experience on every continent (save for Antarctica — one day!), I may have finally figured this female packing list thing out.

I’ve learned that, thankfully, with a few staple items, you can travel just about anywhere without spending a fortune on gear.

The following are my tried-and-true methods and products that, even after almost eight years on the road, I still love and use, and make for the ultimate packing list. Feel free to mix and match and take just what you want. Enjoy!
 

Tip #1: What Bag to Bring

Should you go with a backpack or a suitcase? It depends on your travel destination(s) and length of trip.

I am a huge advocate of backpacks, as it gives me the advantage of mobility (trust me, dragging a wheeled suitcase on a staircase is not fun at all!). It’s also great to not have to wait for your luggage at the airport upon arrival!

Many people are afraid that carrying a backpack will take a toll on their backs, but if you have the right one that fits your body, the weight will be evenly distributed and you will be fine! I highly recommend testing out backpacks (with weights in them) in person (REI stores are perfect for that), as everyone’s body is different.

That being said, these are the tried-and-tested staples that I take with me around the world:

  • I use a 65L REI bag, which is big enough for all of my belongings, including some hiking gear.
  • I use this Pacsafe messenger bag as a day bag, especially for towns like Phnom Penh or Ho Chi Minh City, where drive-by motorbike thieves and bag-slashers are a constant threat; or in much of Europe or South America, where people try to unzip your purse when you’re distracted. There is a wire running through the strap, the colors are not flashy, and it is equipped with hidden pockets that block RFID readers from scanning passport and credit card information. Plus, the zippers lock.
  • Eagle Creek packing cubes are the single most important thing for organizing my clothing and compressing my belongings.
  • If carrying large cameras and a computer, I bring an electronics backpack with locking zippers, which I wear in the front.

 

Tip #2: What Clothes to Bring

backpacker dressed appropriately and fun for the climate
In places where clothing is cheap, such as Southeast Asia and India, don’t stress too much about having a complete wardrobe ready to go before you take off. Just about every girl I met in those regions wore clothing she’d bought on the road. It will suit the climate and, at $3–6 USD per garment, won’t break the bank.

In Europe, Oceania, or anywhere remote, where you might not be able to find cheap clothing or buy it on the road, so bring everything you think you’ll need. These suggest packing lists will help:

Hot Climates

  • 5–7 thin and simple tank tops and T-shirts that can easily mix and match with different bottoms
  • 2–3 pairs of shorts of varying lengths (avoid denim in humid countries, as it takes a long time to line dry)
  • 2 long skirts or dresses
  • 2–3 pairs of light cotton pants and/or leggings
  • 1 set of sleepwear
  • Sufficient underwear to last you at least a week; I suggest 7 pairs of panties, 2 bras, and 2 sports bras
  • 2 sets of interchangeable swimwear
  • 2 pairs of thin socks and 1 pair of normal socks for hiking
  • 1 pair of hiking or running shoes
  • 1 pair of flip-flops (jandals, thongs) or sandals
  • A hat with a brim that will shade your face and a pair of sunglasses
  • 1 sarong or big scarf when modest dress is called for and cooler evenings

Temperate Climates

  • 2–3 tank tops for layering
  • 2–3 long-sleeved shirts for layering
  • 2–3 T-shirts
  • 2–3 tunic shirts or dresses (that will go well with leggings)
  • 1 set of sleepwear
  • 1 pair of jeans or thick pants
  • 1–2 pairs of shorts of varying lengths
  • 1–2 pairs of leggings
  • Sufficient underwear to last you at least a week; I suggest 7 pairs of panties, 2 bras, and 2 sports bras
  • 4 pairs of socks: some for sport shoes and some for boots
  • 1 pair of boots or closed-toed shoes (wear in transit to save space)
  • 1 pair of hiking or running shoes
  • 1 pair of flip-flops (jandals, thongs) or sandals
  • 1 jacket, preferably something waterproof, for all occasions

Cold Climates

 

Tip #3: Toiletries to Bring

I’m happy to report that it’s both easy and straightforward finding shampoo, conditioner, deodorant, and soap. Ladies abroad use these things, too!

Pantene and Dove products seem to be universal, and with the exception of a few really off-the-grid places, such as tiny islands and extremely poor areas where people mostly subsistence-farm, you’ll be able to find basic toiletries easily on the road.

My basic toiletry packing list includes the following:

  • 1 hanging toiletry bag
  • Refillable travel bottles (shampoo, conditioner, body wash, face soap)
  • Facial moisturizer
  • Razor refills
  • Extra contacts
  • Birth control for the length of your trip (if you take it, or consider monitoring your cycle with a free app like Period and using condoms, which are available almost worldwide)
  • Ibuprofen
  • A travel first aid kit
  • A toothbrush, toothpaste, and floss
  • At least one deodorant
  • Sunscreen
  • Tweezers
  • An eyeglasses repair kit
  • Nail clippers
  • Makeup
  • 1 palette of eyeshadow (though I tend to go makeup-free in hot climates!)
  • 1 light powder foundation and bronzer
  • 1 eyeliner and mascara

For prescriptions, the ease of traveling with them will heavily depend on what you need and how much you can get up front, and there is no one-size-fits-all approach. The best way to handle it is to talk to your doctor and insurance regarding how much you can get before you leave and how to best take it across borders.
 

Tip #4: Practical Items

backpacker in the mountains
Though most items such as bedding and pillows are provided in hostels, you’ll need a few other things to make your travels easier and cheaper. The following are my must-haves:

  • A travel line for drying clothing (in Europe, Oceania, and North America, it’s expensive to wash your clothes at a laundromat, so consider your budget)
  • A Diva Cup (a reusable menstrual cup).
  • A microfiber towel (plenty of hostels and camping sites will not have towels, regardless of where in the world they are, so bring your own quick-drying one to save money and hassle).
  • A sleeping bag liner, in case you encounter a hostel that is less than clean.
  • A sarong for easy covering up for temples or at the beach (you can also buy this on the road).
  • A headlamp for camping and as a personal flashlight at night.

 

Tip #5: Products to Keep You (and Your Belongings) Safe

kristin addis, female solo travel expert, with her well-packed suitcase
In my eight years of traveling, I’ve never had anything major stolen. I credit this to watching my belongings like a hawk, always carrying the most important stuff on my person, and using thief-safe travel products. These are the security-related items I swear by:

  • The Pacsafe backpack and bag protector is a wire mesh bag that protects valuables if you’re in a place without lockers or a safe.
  • A personal safety alarm is a good item to bring along instead of mace or pepper spray, which is illegal in many countries and sometimes not allowed even in checked baggage. It’s small and easy to walk around with, and it makes a very loud noise if you press it in an emergency.
  • A lock for lockers, doors, and your belongings when needed.
  • COVID considerations: Welcome to the new normal! Bring a mask (or several) to protect yourself and others. I recommend cloth mask with a filter pocket to reduce your environmental impact.

***

After almost eight years on the road, these are the staples I pack with me. Even with all that, it’s still possible to pack light, travel with just one big bag, and keep your possessions safe and yourself comfortable. It’s all about having the right essentials and leaving home the stuff that doesn’t serve a purpose during your trip.

I suggest you write down what you think you need — and then cut it in half. You never need as much as you think. Doing this will help you travel light.

Kristin Addis is a solo-female-travel expert who inspires women to travel the world in an authentic and adventurous way. A former investment banker who sold all of her belongings and left California in 2012, Kristin has solo-traveled the world for over eight years, covering every continent (except for Antarctica, but it’s on her list). There’s almost nothing she won’t try and almost nowhere she won’t explore. You can find more of her musings at Be My Travel Muse or on Instagram and YouTube.
 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

The post The Ultimate Packing List for Female Travelers appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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Why Jessica is Never Going to Ireland But You Can Go Anywhere

Posted By : webmaster/ 34 0


A woman hiking solo over some mountainus terrain
Last Updated: 4/29/21 | April 29th, 2021

“Your job sounds like the most exciting job in the world,” she said to me. Let’s call her Jessica because I never caught her name. I was outside a bar in Boston and she had overheard a conversation I was having with some friends I hadn’t seen in years.

“He has the best job,” replied my friend.

“So, can you get me to Ireland cheap? I really want to go.”

“Sure,” I replied. “Tell me about your trip.”

Normally when I’m asked about these things, I talk a little bit about my travel guides section, hand over my business card, and tell the person to email me. In my free time, I don’t want to turn into someone’s travel agent.

But, in this moment, I didn’t mind.

“My boyfriend and I want to go to Ireland in the summer, but we don’t know how to afford it.”

“Well, the first thing you should do is go home, and each of you should sign up for a travel-related credit card. That will get you at least 50,000 miles as a sign-up bonus. That’s enough for a free flight. That’s step one.” I said.

“Wait! You get miles for signing up for a credit card!? Really?” Jessica said.

“Yeah, I’ve used these bonuses to get over 400,000 miles just on American Airlines alone. I fly first class with free miles all the time.” I said.

As our conversation continued for a bit longer, Jessica was amazed at all the traveling I’ve done.

“You are either rich or get paid a lot of money,” she said to me.

“Nope,” I told her. “You just need $50 a day, which works out to $18,000 per year.”

“Oh, that’s too much money. I don’t have that.” she said.

So I broke it down for her and had her think about her own expenses and spending habits, and she soon realized that for more money per year, she does a lot less.

“Wow! I never thought about it that way,” an astonished Jessica told me.

I gave the girl my card and wished her well. As she walked away, I turned to my friends, “That girl is never going to visit Ireland.”

After years of talking to people about travel, I can tell when people are serious. My friend’s friend who wrote down the name of companies and websites over a beer was serious. Jessica? She’s not going to Ireland with her boyfriend anytime soon.

Why?

Because, while she was intrigued by all the money-saving tips I was giving her, she wasn’t ready to implement them.

She’s trapped by this belief “travel is expensive.” The look in her eyes told me she didn’t really believe what I was telling her.

See, the travel industry is insidious. It shows you ads like this:

Ads like this create the idea that travel is a luxurious escape from the tedious nature of our lives. And to get to that fabulous place where fun awaits you, we have to pay for it. It’s amazing marketing, even if it is a bit evil.

Magazines show high-price ads, resorts, and tours. Even budget magazine hotel “deals” are $150 per night.

I don’t know about you, but that doesn’t sound budget to me! The whole industry colludes to reinforce this image that travel is a luxury that can only be rarely afforded.

So what happens?

Bombarded by all of these ads, we assume it is the norm. “This is what you have to spend when you go traveling,” we think. Maybe one day, you’ll find a good deal, but you’re still spending thousands for even a quick trip to Ireland.

And no matter how many travel tips and tricks I share, they are too hard to believe. Jessica might be intrigued, she might be interested, but she won’t commit. 

Because the weight of everything she has learned over the years is too great for me to break through. It seems just seems too fantastical to her. It can’t be real — and if it is, it’s unattainable for the average person.

This happens for two reasons:

For starters, people like the path of least resistance. And my way requires more effort. You have to be your own travel agent. It’s a lot more work: I spend hours booking flights, doing research, and comparing deals.

But you know what’s easier? Going online and picking the first deal you see, packing, and setting off on your trip. The path of least resistance is usually the most followed.

Secondly, there’s no frame of reference. People have no experience with my way. I’m just a stranger on the bus. I’m just a guy at a bar, and no matter how logical my argument is, Jessica will still be skeptical. Because she has no proof that this works. To Jessica, I could be selling a Ponzi scheme. But since everyone takes trips the easy way, she knows it, she understands it, and she’ll do it too.

But the girl who took notes? Since I’m a friend of a friend, I come with trust built-in. My friend has vouched for me and my ways. She is far more likely to go up, look up what I said, read my site, and book a trip using my methods.

If you are on this website, you’ve probably overcome both of these barriers. Why do I have a “featured in” section on my homepage where I list publications I’ve been featured in? So people can see that my advice has been vouched for. In the age of faceless Internet sites, trust is the most important thing out there. Jessica has no reason to disbelieve me — but she has no reason to believe me, either.

If you are from Europe, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or some other country where people travel a lot, you’ve probably met people who have traveled around the world, thus you know this idea isn’t just for the rich — it’s for everyone.

No matter how many posts I write about fear or chasing your dreams or how tomorrow will never come, the truth of the matter is that I’m mostly fighting a losing battle.

Even with my friends.

My friend Joe has been dying to go to Amsterdam since I’ve known him. He loves to smoke weed and gamble, and there’s both weed and good poker in Amsterdam.

Every summer when I go to Europe, I say “Joe, come with me.” He says “I’m busy.” Last year, he quit his job. Did he come with me? Nope. In fact, I had to physically be there while he applied for his passport to get him to even get one.

So, while Joe overcame barrier #2, he needed to overcome barrier #1.

The old way of thinking is so ingrained into people’s heads, no matter how much I and others like me can prove that travel is affordable.

Which is why I know Jessica so well. Because her story is like so many others I’ve encountered over the years. I’ve seen it happen so many times before that based on the conversations I’ve had, I can just tell. I know how committed people are to travel when I speak to them.

Maybe Jessica will prove me wrong and take that trip — but I’d bet she doesn’t.

The best ways to save money while traveling won’t even register with her because they will be too foreign, too unreal.
***
Prior to COVID, more and more people were breaking the mold and traveling the world on a budget. Long-term travel has become much more common (and accessible) than it has been in the past. However, while I think people know that there are plenty of ways to travel inexpensively, they also don’t know how to manage it.

You can tell them how to accomplish their travel goals but all just seems too good to be true. So, people fall back to the simple method of, “Let’s just go to Expedia” where they will spend more money — and thus the cycle repeats itself.

Don’t be like Jessica.

Once you understand just a few secrets about budget travel, a trip becomes simple and easy to plan — whether you want on a year-long trip around the world or a just week-long trip to Paris.

All you need to do is walk through these steps and head out your door.

It’s easier than you think.
 

How to Travel the World on $50 a Day

Nomadic Matt's How to Travel the World on $50 a DayMy New York Times best-selling paperback guide to world travel will teach you how to master the art of travel so that you’ll get off the beaten path, save money, and have a deeper travel experience. It’s your A to Z planning guide that the BBC called the “bible for budget travelers.”

Click here to learn more and start reading it today!

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

 

The post Why Jessica is Never Going to Ireland But You Can Go Anywhere appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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What I Pack for My Travels: Your Guide to Packing

Posted By : webmaster/ 39 0


Some of the things I pack with me on my travels
Last Updated: 4/27/21 | April 27th, 2021

After over ten years of traveling the world, what I carry in my bag has changed a lot. Most of that change has to do with the fact that I now carry a lot of gear related to blogging, but it also reflects that I’ve learned a lot about packing since I first hit the road in 2006.

I’ve traveled with big duffel bags, 60L packs, 30L packs, carry-ons, and everything in between. I’ve learned different packing techniques through the years.

And today I want to share that knowledge with you.

So, what should you pack on your trip?

As little as possible.

Packing light is a cliché, yet one that has a lot of truth to it. The more I travel, the more I realize I don’t need a lot of stuff. Everything I need now fits into one backpack.

I like to write down everything I think I’ll need — and then cut it in half. I always ask myself, “Will I use this enough to justify the weight?”

Most of the time the answer is no.

I take only the essentials, and if I really need something I didn’t bring, I buy it on the road. It’s not that hard to find medicine, clothes, or an umbrella overseas.

I also try to stick to the same climate during my trips to avoid having to carry lots of different kinds of clothes. I don’t want to be lugging sweaters around Thailand! However, plans can change, and if that happens, I’ll buy a light jacket or a sweater. I’ll keep it until it is a burden and then give it away.

Also, you can do laundry overseas so I like to carry enough clothes for 7-10 days, do laundry, then repeat. There’s no need to bring a lot of stuff when you can just wash what you have.

As for the long answer to what you should pack? Well, below is my suggested packing list — but you should tailor this to your needs.

(Note: This focuses on travel to a non-winter climate. If you’re heading somewhere cold, you’ll need to adjust accordingly.)

CLOTHES

  • 5 t-shirts
  • 1 long-sleeved T-shirt
  • 1 pair of jeans (heavy and not easily dried, but I wear them a lot — a good alternative is khaki)
  • 1 pair of shorts
  • 7 pairs of underwear
  • 1 bathing suit
  • 1 pair of flip-flops
  • 1 pair of sneakers
  • 8 pairs of socks (I always lose my socks so I take extra! I have no idea where they go?)
  • 1 pair of dress shoes (heavy to carry around, but when I visit friends, we usually go somewhere not sneaker-friendly. This is destination dependent. I do this more in Australia and Europe and less so everywhere else.)
  • 1 dress shirt (for going to a respectable place in the evening)
  • 1 pair of black dress socks

TOILETRIES

  • 1 toothbrush
  • 1 tube of toothpaste
  • 1 package of dental floss
  • Deodorant
  • 1 razor
  • 1 small bottle of shampoo
  • 1 small bottle of shower gel
  • 1 towel (always pack a towel!)

SMALL MEDICAL KIT

  • Band-Aids
  • Hydrocortisone cream
  • Antibacterial cream
  • Eye drops
  • Tylenol
  • Hand sanitizer

For more on first aid kits, check out this detailed post on how to make one for any destination.

GEAR

MISCELLANEOUS

 
Special tip: Buy a small backpack so you won’t be tempted to overpack. We subconsciously like to fill empty space, so if you have a big bag, you’re more likely to overpack just so you don’t waste space. By getting a smaller backpack, you’ll be forced to take only the essentials — a mind trick that works very well!

***

I’ve found that this list leaves me wanting for nothing. I’m sure many of you will read this and say, “But what about X?” or “You really don’t need Y.” Well, that works for you, and this list works for me. Tailor your list to suit your travels.

I write this post not because I think there is one perfect way to pack but to answer the recurring question about what I pack and why. This is my list and suits my “chase the summer, live in hostels” lifestyle.

But the real point I want to emphasize is that you really don’t need a lot when you travel. You never need as much as you think.
 

Next Steps

 

How to Travel the World on $50 a Day

Nomadic Matt's How to Travel the World on $50 a DayMy New York Times best-selling paperback guide to world travel will teach you how to master the art of travel so that you’ll get off the beaten path, save money, and have a deeper travel experience. It’s your A to Z planning guide that the BBC called the “bible for budget travelers.”

Click here to learn more and start reading it today!
 
 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

The post What I Pack for My Travels: Your Guide to Packing appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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11 Tips for Mastering Life as a Digital Nomad

Posted By : webmaster/ 47 0


A male digital nomad working on his laptop and smartphone
Posted: 4/19/21 | April 19th, 2021

I’ve been working online since 2008. Back when I started, “digital nomading” wasn’t even a thing with a name! The whole concept has changed a lot since I started with more options, better Wi-Fi, and accommodation to make it easier to work remote.

And from bustling cafés in Paris and laid-back co-working hubs in Medellín to airport lounges and beach joints with dodgy Wi-Fi, I’ve worked pretty much everywhere.

Being able to work from anywhere in the world is an amazing gift. It has opened all kinds of doors I never even knew existed before I started traveling.

However, it isn’t all fun and games. It’s still work.

While I have the flexibility to make my own hours, I still have to put in those hours. Sometimes that can be challenging. Between finding places with fast Wi-Fi, meeting people and networking, balancing work and travel days, being a digital nomad can be tricky if you’re not prepared.

It’s not easy to do, because if you both work and travel, one of those things tends to suffer, especially if you’re not staying in a destination long-term. The faster you move around, the harder it is to balance work and play. In the past, this even led me to have panic attacks.

Most people I know who work remotely have had struggles finding their own personal balance. It takes time and knowing yourself.

As the pandemic continues to reshape how we work and as remote work both more feasible and popular, I thought I’d share a few tips to help new remote workers and digital nomads adjust to working abroad. These tips have helped me find the perfect balance and they can probably help you.
 

1. Have Work Lined Up Before You Go

Contrary to popular belief, you shouldn’t just quit your job and then dive into life as a digital nomad. While it might be tempting to throw caution to the wind and jump into this new and exciting experience, it’s a much smarter plan to start before you leave home.

Most businesses take several months to start making money (and blogs can take years). Unless you have a ton of savings to live off, I wouldn’t suggest you start your new digital nomad job while abroad. Do so at home first. Build your client list, so that by the time you leave, you’re already making some money. That way, you won’t be stressed out trying to launch a business and travel the world at the same time.
 

2. Set a Clear Divide Between Work & Travel

Balance is one of the hardest things about working remotely abroad. In a new country, it’s easy to spend too much time traveling and having fun and not enough time working. New foods, new attractions, new people — all of that can tempt you into spending a bit too much time off the clock.

To make sure you get your work done, set clear boundaries for when you work and when you go exploring. The best digital nomads have strict calendars to ensure they get everything done. Maybe you dedicate entire days to one or the other; maybe you divide up each day. Whatever strategy you choose, stick to it. This will ensure that you get your work done while also getting to experience the destination.

Live by your calendar and you’ll find yourself a lot less stressed because you’ll know that there’s time for everything – because you planned it that way!
 

3. Travel Slow

The best way to balance your work and travel — and get to know destinations in incredible detail — is to go slowly. Don’t head to a new city every other day. Don’t move cities even every week. Consider spending weeks (if not months) in one place.

That way, you’ll have plenty of time to build productive habits and routines while getting an in-depth experience of the destination you’re in. You’ll be able to play tourist, network, attend events, and get a feel for life there more than the standard tourist does. I can’t recommend this enough. Quality over quantity!
 

4. Check the Wi-Fi

When you work online, fast Wi-Fi is vital. Before you choose your destination(s), take a look at the Wi-Fi situation. Is it easily accessible? Is it fast? Can you get a SIM card for reliable data?

Every country varies, and even regions within countries vary, so be sure to do some research before you go. This is especially important for anyone working with video or photography who has to upload large files.

To find out more about the Wi-Fi speeds in different countries, use nomadlist.com. It’s a great resource for digital nomads that will give you an up-to-date look at the Wi-Fi situation where you’re going (among many other factors).

Moreover, before you rent an Airbnb or long-term stay, ask the owners to send you a screenshot of their Wi-Fi speed. I’ve spent a lot of time trying to find good Wi-Fi in countries and I can tell you nothing kills your productivity than spending the day finding good Wi-Fi when you could have it at your place from the start!
 

5. Connect with Locals & Expats

One of the best things about travel is the people you meet. As a digital nomad, you’ll get to embed yourself into a community for longer periods of time than a tourist would. You’ll be able to network, attend events, co-work with people, and meet travelers and locals alike.

So make sure you get out of your shell and connect with other people regularly. Not only will it be fun but the networking opportunities can help your business. Meetup.com, The Nomadic Network, and Couchsurfing are three good places to start.

Additionally, stop by a nearby co-working space. It will likely have regular events worth checking out. Coworker.com is a good resource for finding such spaces.
 

6. Get a VPN

As a digital nomad, you’ll be connecting to Wi-Fi networks in all kinds of places. Banking, personal messages, email — they can all be accessed if you aren’t careful. Make sure your information is protected by using a reliable virtual private network (VPN), which masks your online signature so your data can’t be stolen. Just like you’d secure your valuables in a hostel locker or hotel safe, you also need to secure your online data while abroad. A VPN like TunnelBear can help you do just that. They have comprehensive coverage for just $3.33 USD per month (they also have a basic free plan so you can try them out first).
 

7. Invest in Noise-Canceling Headphones

If you’re one to get easily distracted (or if you have a lot of meetings you need to attend), invest in a good pair of noise-canceling headphones like the wireless Bose QC 35 II, which are great for working in busy environments (such as co-working spaces) as well as on buses or planes, where there is ambient noise from the vehicle itself. If you like peace and quiet when you work, these are a worthwhile investment — especially if you’re going to be working in all kinds of unconventional places!
 

8. Get Travel Insurance

I never leave home without travel insurance. I’ve had too many mishaps — not to mention the hundreds of injuries and inconveniences I’ve heard about over the years from readers. From lost luggage to delayed flights to petty theft, travel insurance ensures that you’re made whole after things so sideways (and if you’re on the road for a long time, eventually things will go sideways).

While World Nomads is my go-to insurance company, I strongly recommend SafetyWing for those working abroad. Its plans are designed specifically for digital nomads and long-term travelers and feature super affordable monthly rates (with deductibles), making them one of the cheapest options out there. The customer service is top-notch and their plans cover all the basics. If you’re a digital nomad just getting started, this is the company I would recommend.
 

9. Check the Time

If you have a job that requires meetings with other people, make sure to keep time differences in mind. You don’t want to be waking up at 4am for a conference call! Or have emails flooding in right when you’re about to log off for the day.

That’s not to say you can’t travel to far-flung destinations, but you’ll need to communicate the time difference to your team and/or clients. Let them know where you are and when they can expect a reply. That way, you won’t feel pressured to wake up at random hours for emails or calls. You can use Time Zone Converter for that.
 

10. Bring a Water Bottle

Tap water in much of the world isn’t safe to drink. Sure, maybe it won’t kill you, but it can wreak havoc on your digestion for days or weeks or months on end. While bottled water is an affordable alternative, it’s incredibly wasteful. Destinations all around the world are struggling with pollution from single-use plastic, much of which ends up in the ocean.

Be a responsible traveler and get yourself a reusable bottle with a built-in filter. LifeStraw makes ones that remove 99.9% of bacteria and parasites, keeping you safe as you travel the world. Another great option is SteriPen, which uses UV light to get the same result. Either way, bring a reusable bottle so you can safely drink water while avoiding single-use plastic.
 

11. Don’t Forget to Log Off

When I first started out, I definitely had problems with this. When you’re your own boss, it’s all too easy to constantly be working: checking your email here and there, planning projects, working from bed when you should be sleeping (or out sightseeing!). While starting a new business entails a lot of work, always make sure you set boundaries. Email can wait. Projects can wait. Follow your work schedule. Don’t fall into the trap of overworking.

The Internet never stops and it will take all you give it. Don’t let it control you. Because it’s very easy for those “few hours of work” to turn into an entire day in a cafe.

The whole point of working abroad is to experience life in a new country. Don’t waste the opportunity.

***

Life as a digital nomad is incredibly liberating. While it takes a lot of hard work and organizational skills, it also provides incredible flexibility and opportunities.

However, it’s still a job, and that means you need to be smart about how you go about things. By following these simple tips, you’ll be able to start your career as a digital nomad on the right foot and avoid the most common pitfalls.
 

How to Travel the World on $50 a Day

Nomadic Matt's How to Travel the World on $50 a DayMy New York Times best-selling paperback guide to world travel will teach you how to master the art of travel so that you’ll get off the beaten path, save money, and have a deeper travel experience. It’s your A to Z planning guide that the BBC called the “bible for budget travelers.”

Click here to learn more and start reading it today!
 
 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

 

The post 11 Tips for Mastering Life as a Digital Nomad appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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How to Start a Travel Blog

Posted By : webmaster/ 83 0


a laptop on a desk
Last Updated: 4/13/21 | April 13th, 2021

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links, including the links for HostGator and Bluehost. At no additional cost to you, I earn a commission if you make a purchase using these links. If you have any questions about the companies or my status as an affiliate, please don’t hesitate to email me.

Whether as a hobby or profession, starting a travel blog is pretty easy. You can set it up in under 30 minutes. It’s a lot easier than when I started my blog in 2008. Back then, I didn’t know the first thing about making a website. Luckily, on my adventures around the world, I met Matt and Kat, a British couple who also happened to be web designers.

When I came home and decided I wanted to start this travel blog, they agreed to help me set it up and teach me HTML. I hand-coded the website and used a funky tool called Dreamweaver to build it. It was painfully slow and I wasn’t very good at it. (And my original website was really ugly!)

Luckily, you no longer have to build websites that way!

Creating a website has gotten a lot easier and simpler thanks to WordPress, an out-of-the-box platform designed to make sites easier for those not technically savvy (like myself). It powers over 25% of the internet and is the best platform to start a blog on. It’s super flexible and can do whatever you want it to do — from a simple journal to complex blogs and e-commerce websites.

In our blogging masterclass, we’ve had thousands of students start a website on WordPress without any technical skills. They got them up and running — and you can too!

While I’ve talked about how to succeed as a travel blog in the past, today, I want to give a quick tutorial on how to create a travel blog from scratch in seven easy steps.

 

Step 1: Pick your name

The first thing you need to do is pick a domain name (i.e., your website name). When doing so, there are no hard and fast rules. There’s no such thing as a “wrong domain name,” but there are a couple of rules I like to live by:

  • Make a name that can last – If you pick “JohnsAsiaAdeventure.com” and then you leave Asia, the domain name won’t make sense anymore. Make sure you pick a name that isn’t so focused that if you decide to shift gears, you can keep the same domain name.
  • Don’t date your blog – Don’t pick something related to your age either. “Twenty-Something Travel” becomes really irrelevant when you get older, which actually happened to a blogger I know. Pick a name that can be used no matter your age!
  • Avoid certain words – Avoid words like “nomad,” “vagabond,” “wanderlust,” and “adventure.” They have been done to death, and they will make you seem like you’re copying people, not being original.
  • Pick a name that describes what you do as much as possible – I was a nomad, so “Nomadic Matt” was the best pick for me. If you’re into luxury, put words in your domain name that convey that. You want people to see the name and go, “I get what that website is about.”
  • Keep it short – Use 3-4 words maximum. You want the name that rolls off the tongue. Even Ramit Sethi from “I Will Teach You to Be Rich” abbreviates his site to “I Will Teach” or “IWT.” The shorter, the better.
  • Keep it simple – I’m not a fan of using jargon or slang in your domain name, as I think that makes things confusing for people who don’t know it. The last thing you want is someone saying, “What does that mean?” or being confused. If someone has to think hard about the meaning, then you’ve already lost them. So don’t try to be clever!

 

Step 2: Sign up for a host

After you’ve picked out your domain name, you’ll need to register it online and buy hosting (the little computer in the sky that’s going to power your website). There are a lot of basic hosting companies out there — and most of them are pretty terrible.

However, the two biggest and best are HostGator and Bluehost. I would go with one of those two.

While they are owned by the same parent company, I lean toward HostGator, as I find its call center customer service quicker and friendlier, and HostGator is prone to fewer outages (no one wants their website to go down!). It’s also really improved its service and now offers free SSL certificates (that’s the thing that tells users your website is secure).

Here’s a walk-through of how to set up your host with HostGator (it won’t take long):

First, head over to the website’s sign-up page and get hosting for only $2.78 per month. That’s over 60% off the normal price!

Enter your desired domain name at the top of the page. Make sure before you signup that the domain you want is available so as to avoid issues with your signup process.

The system will then prompt you to take out “domain privacy protection” which we recommend you do.

Why? This will hide your address and contact details from appearing online when someone queries your domain name. By law, website registry information is public. If you don’t opt for domain privacy, your information will be on public record – and you’ll probably get annoying calls from people trying to help you with your website. Be sure to opt-in for domain privacy so you don’t get annoying phone calls. Hostgator will be listed on the registry not you and you won’t get any spam!

If you already have a domain name but need hosting, simply select the “I already own this domain” from the tab at the top. Then, enter your domain name and continue to the next step.

Make sure you have selected the right hosting plan from the drop-down list and then select the billing cycle you are prepared to pay. The longer you lock in for, the cheaper initial pricing will be.

We suggest starting with the “Hatchling Plan” (which gives you hosting for one single domain) but if you have plans for more than one website then opt for the “Baby Plan” instead to give you room to grow (since you can host unlimited domains with it).

Next, you will then select the username for your account and a security PIN.

Fill out your billing information and preferred payment type (credit card or PayPal.)

You can opt out of all of the additional services on offer by unchecking them.

Review your order details and make sure everything is correct. Then click “Checkout Now!” at the bottom of the page.

Once your order has been received you’ll be redirected to the Hostgator billing portal. You will also be sent two separate emails with the login credentials to your hosting control panel and the billing portal for your Hostgator account. Be sure to save the information. Save them on your computer and/or print the emails for safekeeping.

They will look similar to the example below.

For those of you with an existing domain or a domain purchased from a 3rd party site like Godaddy, take note of the nameservers listed on your hosting account email. You will need to add those to your domain where you purchased it to link your domain and hosting together. Please refer to the support documents from where you bought your domain for exact instructions on how to update your nameservers.

That’s it! All that takes about five minutes from start to finish!

Again, you can click here to go to HostGator to set it up.

 

Step 3: How to Install WordPress

After you’ve registered your domain name and chosen your hosting package, the next thing you’ll want to do is install WordPress. (WordPress is what will actually run the website. The host is simply the computer your site sits on.)

WordPress is an open-source, free web publishing application, content management system (CMS), and blogging tool built by a community of developers and contributors to make it easy for people to blog!

After you’ve paid for your domain, you’ll get an email telling you your login details. Log in to your hosting control panel using the link provided to you by email when you purchased your hosting from Hostgator. The link would look similar to this:

https://gatorXXXX.hostgator.com:2083

The email will be titled “Your Account Info” if you have trouble locating it in your inbox.

Once logged into your control panel, you need to scroll down the settings page to locate the “Software” section. Then click on the “QuickInstall” link. The Software section will be located towards the bottom of the page.

On the page that loads, select WordPress.

Select your domain name from the drop-down. Leave the “directory” rectangle blank and then click next.

Enter the name of your blog, an admin username (Make sure the admin username is hard to guess), your name, your email address and then agree to the terms and conditions below. Then click the “Install” button.

Once the install process has finished, you will be given the password you need to login to your WordPress install. Take note of the password as we will show you how to change that later on. Once you have it saved click the “Login” button.


 

Step 4: Setting up your website

After you’ve installed WordPress, go to domainname.com/wp-admin and use the username and password you created to log in. You’ll see a screen like this after you log in:

Here’s a little overview of the menu on the left side of the screen:

  • Dashboard – The dashboard is the first thing you see when you log in to WordPress, and it’s the main administrative area for your blog.
  • Home – This will take you back to the main dashboard view.
  • Updates – This area will tell you if WordPress, your plugins, or your theme need to be updated.
  • Jetpack – Jetpack is a plugin that allows you to add a spell-checker, contact forms, extra widgets, etc.
  • Posts – You can view all your blog posts here, as well as set up new ones and add categories and tags.
  • Media – Here’s where you can view your media library and add new media content, like photos and videos.
  • Pages – Pages are the individual landing pages on your website (like your About page, Contact page, Resources page, etc.). You can add new pages here as well as review and edit existing ones.
  • Comments – Comments on your blog posts go here. You may want to check the spam folder periodically to make sure you’re not missing real comments.
  • WPForms – WordPress’s contact-form plugin.
  • Marketplace – Here you can create an online marketplace.
  • Appearance – This section lets you entirely customize your site’s appearance.
  • Plugins – Review, install, and update your plugins here.
  • Users – If there’s more than one person accessing your blog, you can create accounts and give them certain privileges here.
  • Tools – This section has certain tools to aid you with management tasks.
  • Settings – You can adjust all your site’s settings here, including things like your blog title and the size of thumbnails being used.
  • Insights – Insights provides traffic and user stats about those visiting your website. (Google Analytics is a better choice, though.)

Plugins are a great way to add additional functionality to a WordPress-powered site. And with over 50,000 listed in the WordPress Repository and many more premium options available from developers, there are endless possibilities as to what you can do with your site. (I’ll list some examples below.)

To get started, click on “Plugins” and then “Add New” when logged into your WordPress dashboard. Here you can search for plugins that you want and install them via a one-click install that automatically installs them to your WordPress platform.

Alternatively, you have the option to upload a plugin you have purchased or downloaded from a third-party site. To do this, see the “Step 3” arrow in the picture above. All you have to do is click “upload plugin” and you’ll be asked to upload the ZIP file of the plugin that you downloaded from the third-party website.

Once you have uploaded a plugin (or searched for one, as I’ve shown in the image below) you can install it.

After clicking the “Install Now” option, the button will change to say “Activate.” This allows you to enable the plugin on your site and makes it ready to be configured and used.

If you can think of a feature you’d like to have on your site, I can almost guarantee there is a plugin for it, but here are the essential ones for your travel blog:

  • Akismet – Just like getting junk mail in your mailbox, your website will get spammers looking to leave junk comments on your site. Akismet seeks to reduce the amount of this by automatically filtering it for you. This plugin comes installed with WordPress.
  • Yoast SEO – The best SEO plugin out there. This combines the ability to create meta tags and descriptions for your posts, optimize your titles, create a sitemap for search engines to read, customize how your posts appear across social media and do a whole lot more. It’s simple, easy to use, and comes with foolproof instructions.
  • Relevanssi – While WordPress does a lot of things well, what it fails at is adding search functionality to your site. Relevanssi seeks to fix this and give your readers the most accurate results when searching on your site.
  • UpdraftPlus – You can never back up your site too much. The WordPress database holds every word you’ve ever written, and if your blog has started to make you a few dollars, you would be nuts not to keep regular backups. UpdraftPlus does it perfectly. With the ability to schedule backups, you needn’t worry about doing it manually (especially useful to the more forgetful among us). There’s also the option to upload backups to Dropbox, Google Drive, and other cloud storage services, ensuring that if the worst does happen, your data will be safe.
  • Grow by Mediavine – A great social sharing plugin for your site. It comes with great a simple set of icons that work well on both desktop and mobile.
  • Cache Enabler – This plugin works by creating saved copies of your site, saving WordPress from having to generate them for every new visitor. This, in turn, cuts down on the amount of work your hosting server has to do and makes loading your web pages much faster.
  • Jetpack – Jetpack (pre-installed) is aimed at supercharging your website with a host of features from WordPress’s free hosting platform, giving you the best of both worlds. With this plugin, you can add a spell-checker, contact forms, extra widgets, and a whole slew of more features, all with just one plugin.
  • Code Canyon – This interactive map is a cool way to highlight your travels and share them with your readers.

 

Step 5: Install your theme

One of the most important things a blog needs besides good content is a good design. People decide in seconds whether or not they trust your website and choose to stay. A visually unappealing website will turn off readers and reduce the number of return visits you get.

So to accomplish a good design, you will need an amazing WordPress theme (i.e., design templates and files).

Luckily, there are lots of out-of-the-box options for you where you can download a predesigned theme, upload it to your website, switch it on, change some settings, and presto! A new look for your website!

You can get:

  • Free themes – Free themes are plentiful and for budding new bloggers looking to make their mark online. They seem like a great option, as they allow you to keep costs low. There are many great free themes online, but most of them are not amazing. If you plan on blogging for a long time, this might become a problem as your website grows. However, if you just need a simple design to blog for your friends and family, then go the free route. You can find some good free themes at wordpress.org.
  • Premium themes – The next step up from a free theme is a premium theme. Premium themes are paid themes that offer a bit more uniqueness, flexibility, and functionality. These cost $25 USD and up, depending on the developer and features.

I suggest getting a premium theme. Yes, it’s another cost — but here is why you should do it:

  • With a premium theme, you almost always get customer support from the developers. If you get in trouble, they are there for you. You don’t get that with a free theme.
  • With a premium theme, there are more controls and instructions so they are easier to change. Free themes don’t have that.
  • Premium themes tend to be a lot prettier.
  • Premium themes are faster and more SEO friendly.

The best company for themes is StudioPress. They are more SEO-friendly, a bit sleeker, and cooler. Before I had a custom theme, I used Studiopress exclusively. They take the least amount of work to tweak and their support is really great. I recommend them to all my students.

To install your theme, simply go to the left-hand column, click Appearance –> Themes –> Upload.

Whatever theme you picked will come as a .ZIP file for you to easily upload. From there, you just activate it, and it’s turned on! All themes come with a manual and help file so you can customize your design to your specific needs.

(If you want a custom logo or need to hire any designers, two sites to find freelancers are Upwork and 99designs.)
 

Step 6: Create your main pages

After you’ve uploaded your theme, you’re going to want to make a few basic pages on your website in addition to the blog posts. The difference between a page and a post is that a page is a static piece of content that lives separate from the blog. A post is a blog post that gets “buried” as you write more and more. For example, this post is a blog post. When I update again, another blog post will get put on top of it, and it will be pushed down in the archives, making it harder to find.

But a page, like my About page, lives on the top of the website, right near the main URL, and does NOT get buried. It’s a lot easier to find.

To create these pages, go again to your left sidebar and click Pages —> Add New. (For blog posts, use Posts –> Add New.)

I recommend creating four basic pages to start:

  • About page – This where you tell people about yourself and your history, what your blog is about, and why it will help them. This is one of the most important pages on your website, so make it personable!
  • Contact page – People need a way to reach you! Be sure to be very clear on what emails you will and won’t respond to, so people don’t send you spam.
  • Privacy page – This is a standard user agreement page informing readers what the applicable laws on your site are, that you use cookies, etc. etc. You can find out-of-the-box examples throughout the internet.
  • Copyright page – This is a standard page letting people know you own this work and not to steal it. You can find out-of-the-box examples of these, too, throughout the internet.

(If you look in my footer, under the “About Us” section, you can see examples of all four of these pages!)
 

Step 7: Join our blogging program! (optional)

Superstar Blogging travel blogging program
If you’re looking for more in-depth advice, I have a very detailed and robust blogging class that uses my ten plus years of blogging knowledge to help you start, grow, and monetize your website. It gives you a behind-the-scenes look at how I run this website and features detailed analytics, tricks, tips, and secrets about what I do. You’ll learn everything I know about creating a successful blog.

I will help you come up with your domain name, sign up for hosting, create engaging content, go viral, network with bloggers, get media attention, master SEO, create products, grow a newsletter, and make money. I will give you the tools for success — and then show you how to use those tools!

Plus, you’ll weekly strategy calls with me (ask me anything!), tech support and help setting up your blog, and a community of bloggers to help you succeed right out of the gate.

I’ll be there every step of the way. I’ll be your personal mentor.

If you’re interested, click here to learn more and get started!

***

That’s it! You’ve set up your basic website. Sure, there are social media buttons to add, blogs to write, images to upload, and things to tweak but all that comes later. Once you do the steps above, you have the framework needed to create and share your story with the world! To recap on how to start a travel blog:

By following these steps, you can start your travel blog and your stories and tips with the world! (That’s where the real fun begins!) Don’t let the tech scare you. I didn’t know anything when I started. I was totally clueless and had to teach myself how to do this. If I can do this, you can start a blog too! I believe in you! (Email me if you want more encouragement.)

 

(function(d){var s=d.createElement(‘script’);s.type=’text/javascript’;s.src=’https://a.omappapi.com/app/js/api.min.js’;s.async=true;s.dataset.campaign=’crybccx8wyofnc5n1a9f’;s.dataset.user=’8268′;d.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0].appendChild(s);})(document);
 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

Disclosure: Please note that some of the links above are affiliate links, including the links for HostGator and Bluehost. At no additional cost to you, I earn a commission if you make a purchase using these links. If you have any questions about the companies or my status as an affiliate, please don’t hesitate to email me.

The post How to Start a Travel Blog appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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Annual Reader Survey: What Can We Do Better?

Posted By : webmaster/ 58 0


a laptop notebook and smartphone
Posted: 4/12/21 | April 12th, 2021

Hello all!

Just a quick post today.

Once a year, I like doing a reader survey to learn what everyone thinks of the website, discover ways we can improve, find out about things you like that we’re missing, and get a sense of how you all plan your trips and travel.

We didn’t do a survey last year because, well, COVID and all.

But, with the world opening up again and travel so changed, I wanted to do one now.

These surveys help us know a bit more about you, understand your travel style, how you plan, and give us a chance to get your feedback on what content you want to see more (or less) of here on the website.

This year, we’re going to redesign the website, start taking guest posts again, and further develop our virtual and in-person events series.

So, if you want to share your opinion and help shape the direction of this website, click here to fill out the survey. It’s completely anonymous.

This is a longish survey and will probably take 5-10 minutes to complete, but it will really help us improve this website and guide our future content.

With travel resuming in various stages this year, your feedback makes it a lot easier for us to serve you better.

I would greatly appreciate it if you took the time to complete the survey so we’re able to give you the content you need to travel cheaper, safer, longer, and smarter.

That it’s! If you have any questions, drop them in the comments!

Sincerely,

Matt

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

The post Annual Reader Survey: What Can We Do Better? appeared first on Nomadic Matt's Travel Site.





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NEWS: We’re Launching a New Membership Site!

Posted By : webmaster/ 136 0


A group of friends having a picnic at sunset
Posted: 4/1/2021 | April 1st, 2021

Last year, we started a Patreon page as a way to further develop this website’s community. In conjunction with The Nomadic Network, it allowed us to share more stories and connect with readers more through (virtual) events!

Now, we’re taking it a step further by discontinuing our Patreon effort — and introducing “Nomadic Matt Plus”!

When we asked for feedback from our current Patreon members, the number one response was “Make it easy for us to find content. Patreon kind of sucks at that.”

Most people didn’t like going to a third-party website for content or updates in the first place. Moreover, they also said the interface made it hard to access older content, since Patreon doesn’t have a search function. Everything is in a chronological newsfeed and, since we posted a lot there, content just got pushed down further and further.

So we created our own version of Patreon in order to solve those problems.

With our new membership site, members will automatically get email updates when new content is posted. We’ve also simplified the navigation and made it easier to access all our guidebooks and downloadable cheatsheets. And we added a search function to make it easier to find old content.

In short, we’ve created a better and easier user experience for our community members!

As a member of Nomadic Matt Plus, you’ll be part of a community within a community. You’ll have access to special content, events, books, and meet-ups. It’s a way to level up your travels!

As a Plus member, you’ll get:

  • Regular community Q&As with me!
  • Travel planning calls with me!
  • Private Instagram stories
  • Exclusive travel stories and tips not shared anywhere else
  • Content before it appears on the website
  • A members-only Facebook group
  • All our TNN events and virtual replays
  • Free copies of our guidebooks (a $69 value!)
  • Free access to our blogging and writing courses
  • Free tickets to TravelCon
  • Autographed copies of my print books
  • T-shirts so you can have a symbol of your membership (and hopefully spot others when you travel)

We’ve also simplified our membership tiers. We now have three easy plans:

The membership tiers for Nomadic Matt Plus

And, when you join as an annual member, you get three months free!

So if you’re looking for additional travel content that saves you money, Q&As with me, a members-only Facebook group, access to all our guides and courses, exclusive events with other community members, and much more, come join our membership program!

Moreover, if you join now, you’ll be able to attend our first community call on April 5th!

While 99% of our content will always remain free, becoming a club member allows you to get added stories, travel tips, special events, and guidebooks to help you travel cheaper, better, and longer.

You’ll become a master traveler while also connecting more with the other kindred souls in this community! A win-win!

Just click here to sign up today!

If you have any questions, drop them in the comments.

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Nomadic Matt
 

Book Your Trip: Logistical Tips and Tricks

Book Your Flight
Find a cheap flight by using Skyscanner or Momondo. They are my two favorite search engines because they search websites and airlines around the globe so you always know no stone is left unturned.

Book Your Accommodation
You can book your hostel with Hostelworld. If you want to stay somewhere other than a hostel, use Booking.com as they consistently return the cheapest rates for guesthouses and cheap hotels.

Don’t Forget Travel Insurance
Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. I’ve been using World Nomads for ten years. My favorite companies that offer the best service and value are:

Ready to Book Your Trip?
Check out my resource page for the best companies to use when you travel. I list all the ones I use when I travel. They are the best in class and you can’t go wrong using them on your trip.

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